Spanning-Tree UplinkFast

Hello Maodo

The link failure is also detected on SW1 however, the example examines the behaviour of the ports on SW3.

In the diagram, @ReneMolenaar still has the (D) showing up on port fa0/17 on SW1, and this should be removed. I will inform him…

SW3 does sent a TCN to SW1 but not necessarily immediately. Note the SW3# STP: VLAN0001 Fa0/14: root port delay timer active debug line.

The last diagram does not indicate what the states of the ports on SW3 are in order to make a point of determining them from the debug. As mentioned in the text: "You can see we don’t immediately switch back to interface fa0/14. There’s no reason to switch back to this interface ASAP because we have a working root port."

Eventually, the Fa0/16 does become blocked and the Fa0/14 does become the root port with a cost of 3019.

I hope this has been helpful!

Laz

Does sw3fa0/16 going forwarding create a TCN as well and we don’t require the dummy multicast frame? or this is classic stp with uplinkfast enable and not RSTP?

The rstp lesson mentions:
With the classic spanning tree a link failure would trigger a topology change. Using rapid spanning tree a link failure is not considered as a topology change. Only non-edge interfaces (leading to other switches) that move to the forwarding state are considered as a topology change ( in this case sw3 fa0/16). Once a switch detects a topology change this will happen:
•It will start a topology change while timer with a value that is twice the hello time. This will be done for all non-edge designated and root ports.
•It will flush the MAC addresses that are learned on these ports.

Hello Ignacio

When the link fails, SW3 will indeed send a TCN. If you notice earlier in the lesson, just before the multicast frame mechanism is explained, Rene mentions this:

So without the dummy multicast frame mechanism, the flushing of the MAC address table will take 15 seconds due to the TCN, as opposed to the 300 seconds it would normally take. However, the dummy multicast frame improves upon this by updating the MAC address tables of the connected switches almost instantaneously.

I hope this has been helpful!

Laz

port fa0/16 on SW3 was on blocking mode. why did it transition 30 seconds instead of 50 seconds?

Then in what situation does Max age timer plays a role?

Hello Thierno

There are two situations where the re-convergence takes place. The first is in the case of the lesson, where when port fa0/14 is shutdown, there is a complete carrier loss. In this case, the port with the best BPDU information is immediately invalidated. This means that the next best port is immediately chosen, which is fa0/16 without delay, so no 20 seconds are wasted in blocked mode. This is why the transition took 30 seconds, 15 in listening and 15 in learning.

Now if there were another switch between SW1 and SW3, and that switches connection to SW1 failed, fa0/14 would still be active, so no immediate loss of connectivity would be detected by SW3. This means that the whole BPDU exchange process would have to inform SW3 that more valid BPDUs are being received now from fa0/16, so it would then transition using the blocked>listening>learning procedure of 50 seconds.

I hope this has been helpful!

Laz

Hello Thierno

The Max_age timer plays a role when the current root port of the local switch is still up, but a failure has occurred somewhere else upstream. Only then will the Max_age timer need to be exhausted before a port considers the last BPDU it has received invalid. This is also related to the previous post:

I hope this has been helpful!

Laz

Hello Laz,
then what is the purpose of the Max Age timer if the port fa0/16 will move directly to the listening state after that the switch realizes that fa0/14 went down?
My undestanding (and please correct me if I am wrong) is that by default the switch will wait for 20 seconds for fa0/14 to come up again. Only after that the switch will start with the STP recalculation.
Regards,
Fadi.

Hello Fadi

In the scenario that is being described, the port that actually goes down (Fa0/14 on SW3) is on the same switch as the port that is changing state (Fa0/16 on SW3). This means that the switch immediately knows that the current root port is no longer valid, therefore it doesn’t wait for the extra 20 seconds.

If the port that goes down is found on another switch that is upstream in relation to SW3 and the root bridge, then the switch does not immediately know that it’s ND port should begin changing state, so it waits the extra 20 seconds making the total wait time 50 seconds…

I hope this has been helpful!

Laz

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